Safety and the effects of particulate inhalation.

Detroit MI CKEC

New Member
Particulate inhalation and the effects of breathing the caustic alkali vapors is an issue here of recent with a report of an injury.

We have a comprehensive Operations Manual and Hazard Communication Program. Our Safety Manual comprises almost half of the entire manual. We issue a copy of our manual and have employees sign indicating receipt of the manual and the Hazard Communication Program (HCP). "I have read and understand all of the material (indicated by my signature). I understand that I am strictly bound to follow the safety manual procedures -and- all personal protective equipment and equipment safety guards shall be used at all times. I have been informed of each chemical listed in the HCP HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS INVENTORY USED including the area used, and I have been instructed on the safe use of each chemical and trained on the hazards of each chemical." - Employee and Employer sign...all of this supported by training videos, interactive CD's, etc, etc, etc.. The protective equipment is issued and kept in ready supply. Constant reminders are given and discipline when and where necessary.

I have everything short of blood signatures and rights to first born children and I have a no call no show Technician 03/19/01 who does in fact call 03/20/01 to report he "took a blast of chemical in the throat" while he was working 03/18/01 that went unreported (contrary to guidelines) etc, etc, etc...

So...I guess the question is, When is enough enough ? What have I missed, other than the "labor factor" ? What works for you ?

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Shawn Corbett - Certified Kitchen Exhaust Cleaner
Pro-Ducts Kitchen Exhaust System Cleaning
Detroit, MI
313-297-6657
 

Schmutz Man

New Member
Hi Shawn,

I don't think people who read this board understand your question, You'll have to write slower!
My suggestion to you is get with your attorney and keep that employee on your gift list.

Schmutz man

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David Saulque

<b>PWN TEAM - Hood Moderator</b><br<b><font color=
Shawn

Well now, I think you said it very well-the government sees everything as a people hazard waiting to happen. With this in mind it should be a wake up call to all of us who are open to this liability.

Oh yes that was the short version I am sure.

David

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Richard

New Member
Shawn
I tell the guys to wear a Fullface respirator, full suit and rubber gloves when spraying caustic, each unit has the equipment and so far the worst thing has been very minor burns (just real red)
I know they don't wear them the whole time, but when they're spraying they do, I really dont expect them to wear it all when washing down, usally just googles, face shield and rain jacket are good enough. As far as big brother goes... it'll never be enough
Richard



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Detroit MI CKEC

New Member
All is well that ends well...after a review of the medical record it would appear this is not a work related injury and was not deemed workers compensation - a pre-existing condition may have been exacerbated by caustic particulate inhalation because his respirator was not worn.

This did compel us to review our guidelines and procedures and update. We were pleased we had a comprehensive Hazard Communication Program and Safety Manual in place, trying to gather information like M.S.D. Sheets after the fact is too late.

We have changed our respirators to a readily available brand and model available through Grainger who offered us great technical support. Grainger also offers a reasonably priced respirator video good for training.

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Shawn Corbett - Certified Kitchen Exhaust Cleaner
Pro-Ducts Kitchen Exhaust System Cleaning
Detroit, MI
313-297-6657
 

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